Kaluau Pig Mele Luau

Luau Imu

View the way a traditional imu ceremony is performed at a luau

What is an Imu Ceremony at Mele Luau Coral Crater Oahu

Become part of an Authentic Hawaiian Luau that combines a Hawaii plantation style tasting menu with unforgettable Polynesian entertainment, unique activities and fascinating demonstrations.  Mele Luau Oahu will take you through Hawaii and its cultures and traditions.  The Luau starts off with a Lei greeting and escort to your table, where you will be able to enjoy the beautiful view of a luau Kapolei Hawaii.

As the Mele Luau at Coral Crater unveils the roasted pork, a Hawaiian Imu ceremony is performed. The care that goes into preparing the pig and unveiling it will be evident.

Luau Imu Pit

When you are looking for a luau to add to your Hawaii vacation, the term imu ceremony will likely come up. Perhaps you are wondering what an imu is and why there is a ceremony. An underground oven called an imu uses hot coals, stones, layers of leaves and cloth to steam food. The imu is used to prepare the delicious shredded pork kalua, which is a staple of any luau menu.

Although it is most commonly associated with the Hawaiian luau, the use of the earth to make an oven isn’t limited to these islands. You’ll find evidence of earth ovens used in all parts of the globe, whether you look east or west.

Mele Luau the newest Oahu’s luau performs at Coral Crater Adventure Park, Kapolei, Oahu Hawaii

Imu Rocks

The Imu is a traditional Hawaiian underground oven used to cook meats, vegetables and other dishes. The Imu typically uses rocks as a heat source, which is why it’s often referred to as an “Imu Rock.”

A luau usually begins with an imu ceremony before dinner. The ceremony involves removing layers of leaves and cloth from the pit oven in order to expose the pork. The pork is taken out of the pit and brought to the kitchen for shredding. Although there isn’t much pomp and circumstance, it is fascinating to observe this ancient cooking method.

Luau Terminology: What is an Imu?

You will be immersed in Hawaiian traditions as you attend a luau. Luau traditions originate in Polynesia and are reflected in almost every aspect of the celebrations, even the food. A method of cooking used in Hawaiian luau that has been widely adopted across Europe, the Pacific and the Americas is one of its most distinctive elements.

Hawaii Earth Oven

People living on islands throughout the Pacific love to use earth ovens for special occasions. The oven is also known in Polynesia as an umu. In Micronesia it’s called either a lovo, or koua. It’s also known as a “toku” in the Solomon Islands.

Polynesia’s traditional cooking method is to use a hot-rock oven. This oven uses only natural cooking tools found on the islands and prepares delicious meals.

An imu, a Hawaiian underground oven that is dug into the ground and used for cooking any type of meat or seafood, is a traditional Hawaiian underground oven.

It is entirely natural to cook with an imu. The fire is started with kindling and the base of the food is laid on rocks. Between the meat and the rocks is a layer of banana leaves, coconut palm leaves, and ti leaves. A bed of vegetables is placed on top of the meat. The juices from the protein will make kalua pork. Laulau is another popular imu dish. This is a combination of fish and vegetables wrapped in taro leaves that are steam teamed with the pork

Although it is most commonly associated with the Hawaiian luau, the use of the earth to make an oven isn’t limited to these islands. You’ll find evidence of earth ovens used in all parts of the globe, whether you look east or west.

Imu Ceremony Hawaii

Imu River Rocks

River rocks can be heated using burning wood. Once the rocks have reached a certain temperature, the wood is removed and the meat is placed on top. To keep the steam and smoke out, the meat is covered with banana leaves. The hot rocks then slow cook the meat for hours.

Above Ground Imu

In Hawaii, an imu is usually dug deeper into the ground than in Samoa, while it is often more above ground in Samoa. However, they are cooked and prepared in very similar ways.

Installing an Imu

To set up an imu, the first step is to lay down a foundation of wood. He used an ironwood type for its density and ability burn and flame hot.

All the river rocks have been piled on top the base of wood in the form of a pyramid and are ready to be lit.

We can lighten the wood by using a piece cardboard. This will allow us to burn the wood and heat the rocks. The wood will soon be lit up and the rocks will sit in the flames.

Imu In Hawaii

The imu takes approximately 2 hours to heat. During Mele Luau Oahu you can explore Coral Crater Adventure Park Luau grounds.  We begin by removing all wood and burned charcoal from the ironwood. It is still smoldering.

An imu is not for grilling. Instead, the coals and wood are used to heat the rocks.

After removing any wood or charcoal, the only thing left is the piles of rocks. These are almost like mini volcanoes.

To make the rocks more even and provide a flatter surface for pigs, we spread them out.

To make sure the rocks are hot, we cut down a banana tree, then tear it into strips. This helps to tone down the heat rocks so that the meat does not come in direct contact with the hot rocks and burn.

The pork is lightly seasoned with Hawaiian salt and a slice of onion. There is not much else.

Imu Ceremony

Imu River Rocks

River rocks can be heated using burning wood. Once the rocks have reached a certain temperature, the wood is removed and the meat is placed on top. To keep the steam and smoke out, the meat is covered with banana leaves. The hot rocks then slow cook the meat for hours.

Above Ground Imu

In Hawaii, an imu is usually dug deeper into the ground than in Samoa, while it is often more above ground in Samoa. However, they are cooked and prepared in very similar ways.

Installing an Imu

To set up an imu, the first step is to lay down a foundation of wood. He used an ironwood type for its density and ability burn and flame hot.

All the river rocks have been piled on top the base of wood in the form of a pyramid and are ready to be lit.

We can lighten the wood by using a piece cardboard. This will allow us to burn the wood and heat the rocks. The wood will soon be lit up and the rocks will sit in the flames.

Imu In Hawaii

The imu takes approximately 2 hours to heat. During Mele Luau Oahu you can explore Coral Crater Adventure Park Luau grounds.  We begin by removing all wood and burned charcoal from the ironwood. It is still smoldering.

An imu is not for grilling. Instead, the coals and wood are used to heat the rocks.

After removing any wood or charcoal, the only thing left is the piles of rocks. These are almost like mini volcanoes.

To make the rocks more even and provide a flatter surface for pigs, we spread them out.

To make sure the rocks are hot, we cut down a banana tree, then tear it into strips. This helps to tone down the heat rocks so that the meat does not come in direct contact with the hot rocks and burn.

The pork is lightly seasoned with Hawaiian salt and a slice of onion. There is not much else.

We add some heat to the pig’s top by using natural tongs and giant chopsticks made from banana trunk pieces that have been folded over.
An imu doesn’t have to be just for kalua pork eating. You can cook fish, mango raised meat, turkey, or any other type of meat.
We can add around 20 layers to a pile of leaves. Then, we arrange them in a crisscross pattern, covering the pig and hot rocks below.
To keep the imu hydrated, and to preserve more steam and smoke, we add a layer of moist gunsack.
In Hawaii and Polynesia they sometimes use a tarp to cover the top of the imu. This protects it from the rain and seals in the moisture.
Mele Luau at Coral Crater begins a bit later in Hawaii so that you can enjoy the day! Mele Luau begins at 5:45 PM. The first part of the ceremony involves the removal of the pig from its imu.
You will immediately notice the smell of the smoky pork as soon as you take off the banana leaves.
Kalua pork plate is excellent, leaner and still tender. It’s full of smokeiness.
The evening of Mele luau will feature entertainment such as singing and dancing and performances from Polynesia.
For most guests, however, it is all about the kalua pork, which is cooked in the imu. This is what makes Mele Luau Oahu so special.
Steam is used to cook the food. It helps keep it moist and, in the case with pork, tender. The entire process can take over a day, from building the imu to heating the stones and cooking the food thoroughly. However, the end result is well worth it. It is a wonderful combination of flavors and tender, juicy meat.

Kaluau Pig Mele Luau

Kalua Pig


This method of cooking, also known locally as an “imu”, is used most often to prepare kalua pork and other delicious delicacies for the luau celebration. An imu is simply an oven that’s built by digging a hole in the ground. Although it might seem simple, it’s actually quite efficient and allows for large amounts of food to cook slowly at once. This is why imu is almost exclusively used in large parties and ceremonies.

The luau is already prepared and ready to be eaten. Digging a hole with sloped sides and a depth of 2 to 4 feet is necessary for preparation. The amount of food being cooked will determine the size of the oven.

Ti leaves

Hawaiian Ti Leaves are a popular plant in Hawaii. They are used for many purposes, including making leis and ti leaves are also used in the imu, or underground oven. The ti leaves help to keep the heat in the imu and cook the food.

The ti leaves are also edible and can be cooked in the imu or eaten raw. They have a slightly sour taste and are a good source of vitamin C. Ti leaves are often added to salads or other dishes.

Hawaiian Ti Leaf Plant

Ti leaves are an important part of Hawaiian culture and tradition. They add flavor to food and play an important role in cooking traditional Hawaiian dishes. If you visit Hawaii, be sure to try ti leaf dishes!  

Ti Leaf Plant Hawaii

After the show, you will have the opportunity to participate in traditional Hawaiian games such as coconut husking, lei making and more. Mele Luau Oahu provides an unforgettable evening of culture, cuisine and entertainment for all ages. Book your tickets today!

Mele Luau Oahu

Your feast consists of many courses: enjoy the inspiring Mele Luau dinner!

Imu Ceremony FAQ

What is IMU at a luau?

An imu is a type of under oven that steams meat using a combination of burning coals, rocks, and layers of foliage, fabric, or matting. The imu is used at luaus to prepare the exquisite kalua pork, which is a luau tradition.

What can you cook in an IMU?

Traditional subterranean ovens have been used to cook and steam food across Hawaii. Entire pigs, fruits, bananas, potatoes, poi, fowl, and seafood at a Luau are traditionally steamed in a pit oven called an imu by the Hawaiians.

What is the pig called at a luau?

A shredded pork meal known as kalua pig is one of the most delectable alternatives at any Hawaiian luau. The presentation of most luaus is accompanied by an elaborate ritual.

Why Do Hawaiians Cook pig in the ground?

To guarantee that the food is not polluted by the dirt it is buried under, the layers of plants covering the food must extend beyond the pit’s sides. The meat is subsequently cooked for many hours in the pit.

How deep should an IMU be?

Creating an Imu

A 2- to 4-foot deep pit with steep sides is excavated as part of the preparation. The volume of the broiler is determined by the quantity of food being cooked. It’s very normal to cook with an imu at a traditional Hawaiian luau. To start the fire, wood is utilized, and pebbles are usually used as a foundation for the meal to rest on.

What does kalua pig taste like?

Kalua pig has a smoky flavor, but it’s the earthy flavor it gets from the soil and banana/ti leaves that sets it apart. It’s virtually hard to prepare really authentic kalua pig as a mainlander. (Unless you want to go to Hawaii, build an imu, and smoke an entire hog.)

Mele Luau Oahu at Coral Crater

Mele Luau Oahu is the hottest new luau near Ko Olina, Oahu, Hawaii

Address

Coral Crater Adventure Park

91-1780 Midway St #1, Kapolei, HI 96707

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